South Australia

South Australia

Experiences of SA German-Australians in the early 1900s (in development)

South Australia had the largest German-born and German-heritage population in the country. Between 1899 and 1945 Australia was involved in 3 wars, all of which included Germany as the enemy. How were the German-Australian population treated during this turbulent time? Did they remain aloof from Australian culture and retain the German identity, or did they consider themselves Australian?


South Australian Lutherans: Were they National Socialists?

The question has long been asked as to whether the Lutheran Church, with its German heritage, was infested with National Socialists during the 1930s.

This topic explores the history of the Lutheran Church, its connections with Germany by the 1930s, the response of the Lutherans to National Socialism, and the impact the Nazis had on the Church before, during, and after the war.


South Australian Lutherans in the 19th century (in development)

Lutheran immigration to Australia had a large impact on early South Australian society as their hard working nature contributed significantly to the development of the colony. Soon after arriving however the church experienced upheaval and schism, transforming from a united, single organisation into several smaller synods.

Topic covers the religious situation in Germany during the early 1800s, the initial emigration of the Lutherans to South Australia, Australian Lutheran church history, their connection with Germany, and their experiences as new Australians.


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