England

England

Using early records - a case study from Norwich

What happens when your family history research manages to creep back to the 16th and 17th centuries? Do records survive from that far back? If so, what are they, where can they be found and how do you use them?


The Great Plague of London 1665-6

This plague devastated the crowded suburbs of London, causing many of the wealthy to flee to the country to escape the noxious ‘miasma’. What caused it, what was its impact and why has it never returned? This popular presentation will fascinate us all.


The Great Plague of London 1665-6

This plague devastated the crowded suburbs of London, causing many of the wealthy to flee to the country to escape the noxious ‘miasma’. What caused it, what was its impact and why has it never returned? This popular presentation will fascinate us all.


The Watermen and Lightermen of London

In days gone by the River Thames was a conduit for trade and travel and for centuries passengers and goods were carried by the watermen and lightermen of London. They have a fascinating history and many records have survived to help you gain an insight into any of your ancestors that were part of this trade.


Occupational records in England

A general look at the availability and accessibility of records to do with occupation, both trades and professional occupations. (And a lighthearted look at strange occupations)


What were the Quarter Sessions?

This presentation will show you what the quarter sessions were and where you can access them and other similar records. It will also demonstrate their importance to town and parish life.


Lesser known London records

Ancestry.com has done an excellent job of providing us with digitised records for our London ancestors. However there are a number of lesser know records that can also be very helpful. A case study will show what these records are and how to use them.


The English Poor Laws

There are few genealogists who have not found paupers among their ancestors. This talk will give you an introduction to the English Poor Laws (Old and New). As well, it will look at some of the documents useful for researching the poor.


Dodgy claims: the Landed Gentry Drews of Ireland and Devonshire

With evidence suggesting that some of Carol Baxter’s Irish ancestors descended from an Irish Landed Gentry family that itself descended from a Landed Gentry family living in Devonshire in the 1500s, she jumped at the opportunity to learn the skills of pre-Reformation research. It took her on a fascinating journey as she questioned what had long been accepted, and pursued sources that led her to break new ground. This seminar uses these Drew families as a case study in undertaking pre-Reformation historical research.

– 30/60 minutes – Powerpoint presentation


RELATIVELY SPEAKING UK Research

Contact
Founded
  • 1978

RELATIVELY SPEAKING  UK GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH SERVICES

share
Syndicate content