British Isles

British Isles

British research – various research topics on specific eras and places

 including Gaelic Scotland, UK genealogy on the internet, Tracing your Scottish ancestors, Irish online resources


The Coming of the Railways

The rapid introduction of the railways in the UK had profound consequences, leading to the enormous growth of new suburbs in the big cities, and mass movements of people as they gravitated to new places of employment. And the concept of a holiday by the seaside was born! The railways were also huge employers of labour, both in the construction and operating phases. This presentation explores the changes in society that resulted and the accessibility of useful records about the railways and the people involved.


Trace your descendants online

Tracing descendants is quite different to tracing ancestors and access to modern records is restricted in various countries. This talk describes approaches to adopt in Australia, UK and Ireland and examines the online records that can help identify long-lost relatives. Two brief case studies will illustrate the challenges and how they were overcome.


My ancestor was an apprentice...

What were guilds? What were Livery Companies? How were apprentices recruited and supervised? This presentation will outline a short history of guilds and detail the types of records that exist to find information about them and where it can be accessed.


Discover Your Ancestors Periodical

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Magazine/Journal
  • Discover Your Ancestors Periodical, monthly, £12
Founded
  • 2011

Discover Your Ancestors Periodical is a high quality monthly digital magazine delivered to your inbox every month. Packed full of stories, case studies, social history articles and research advice, this regular and affordable service is a must have for anyone starting out in family history research, or for those with more experience but who have reached brick walls. Expert guidance and inspiration around historic themes merge to create an informative and educational guide through your journey of research. It’s really easy to read, too.

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Bearing arms for the King: tracing British military ancestors

Carol Baxter is the descendant of a First Fleet marine who later joined the NSW Corps, and of a British soldier who was taken prisoner during the American War of Independence, and has spent a considerable amount of time researching these ancestors. She has also examined military records in depth in her role as General Editor of the Biographical Database of Australia. This seminar will provide an overview of military records available in Britain and Australia and guide you towards the sources you can readily access.  

- 45/60 minutes – Powerpoint presentation


Something from nothing: reading between the lines of military records

While General Editor of the Biographical Database of Australia, Carol Baxter examined all the Muster Books and Pay Lists for Governor Macquarie’s 73rd Regiment of Foot, which served in New South Wales between 1810 and 1814. By examining the records of all the soldiers, rather than simply looking for information about an individual soldier, she made the astonishing discovery that she could determine a huge amount of information about the lives of the rank and file even when the lists themselves included no information against a particular soldier’s name.


Tagged: Surnames in the making

Most family historians think little about the surnames they are tracing even though most of us would have gathered information about the origin of our own surnames. Yet many of their ancestors’ surnames came into existence 800 years ago and provide information about their lives at that particular time. This seminar provides a fascinating exploration of the history and origins of British surnames.  

- 30/60 minutes – Powerpoint presentation


Nicked! Tracing criminals and their crimes in Britain and Australia

Carol Baxter not only has convict ancestors of her own, she researches and writes about criminals in her popular histories – which fall within the sub-genre “true historical crime”. In fact, two of her books were long-listed for the Davitt Award for women crime writers. She edited the CD-ROM Convicts to NSW 1787 to 1812 (Society of Australian Genealogists, 2002) – a transcription and compilation of all the convict transportation records for that period – and, while General Editor for the Biographical Database of Australia, edited similar records for later years.


Findmypast - the World Collection

Exactly what is happening at findmypast? The last couple of years have seen huge growth in multiple directions – in records from Australia and New Zealand, Ireland, America, in the original UK site itself and the launch of the British Newspaper Archives by brightsolid. All this means much better access to records for local and family historians and is very exciting to see. Where to now?


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