Talk Summaries

ACCESSING GOVERNMENT & PRIVATE ARCHIVES - Graham Jaunay
There are a number of archives available to family researchers, some well-known and others less so. This talk will cover a summary of the holdings and how to access the material in the collections deemed most useful to family historians.

GATHER, ORGANISE & PRESERVE YOUR PERSONAL & FAMILY STORIES - Annie Payne
Does the accumulation of your personal and family stories, photos and memorabilia resemble a knotty ball of wool? Learn some simple steps on how to gather the information you need, organise the details into a manageable system and decide on the preservation program which best suits you and your family.

ORAL HISTORY: TIPS FOR HISTORIANS - Patricia Sumerling
The use of the spoken word in a history adds a sense of authority and a rich dimension that creates the ‘one degree of separation’ from a past event or gives insight into someone’s character or an opinion about a major decision.
However, memory cannot always be relied upon when interviewing people. Further, you can never obtain all the answers you hope for within a given time unless you are well informed about the background to the subject or have carefully considered what questions you are going to ask. This talk is about being prepared before you set out to interview.

PRINTING YOUR BOOK - David Sweeney
A brief overview of the various options available for the production of your history. We will cover aspects from set up to binding styles and cost effective options for publications of all shapes, sizes and quantities.

PUBLISHING & MARKETING - SELF PUBLISHING OR WITH A RECOGNISED PUBLISHER - John Scardigno, Peacock Publications & Michael Bollen, Wakefield Press)

RESEARCHING THE HISTORY OF A HOUSE OR PROPERTY - Peter Bell

SO, YOU WANT TO WRITE HISTORY? - Peter Donovan

SPORTING HISTORY & BIOGRAPHY - Ashley Mallett
His various experiences with books, how he used to approach a biography how this method has changed since.

UNDERSTANDING CONTEXT IN HISTORY OR A WORK OF FICTION - Patricia Sumerling
Having decided to write about your community, your family, or to write a work of historical fiction, have you thought about the context within which your subject is situated? As you embark on your research you need to think ‘outside the box’. This talk will give you ideas on how to add depth to your story or history by understanding themes such as how local or world events, environmental changes, political upheavals, economic booms and busts, and social matters can affect your history.

WHAT I MEANT TO SAY WAS... - Jackie van Bergen
Have you ever read a text and been distracted from the content by errors? Have you ever written anything and later wished you hadn’t? Have you read what you have written over and over and still missed simple mistakes? Proof reading isn’t just about spelling and grammar. Spell check and grammar check don’t pick up everything. Misplaced punctuation can completely alter the meaning of your text. Consistency in style is also very important. Don’t get tense over your tense. Jackie provides some basic tips to help improve your writing.

WRITING CREATIVE NON-FICTION - Carol Baxter
Through-out history, societies have used stories to bring the world to life, using narrative as a vehicle for education as well as entertainment.  Creative non-fiction is a genre that allows writers to communicate facts in a style that appeals to the broader market – the popular market. 

WRITING FOR MAGAZINES & LOCAL MEDIA - Cassie Mercer

WRITING INTERESTING FAMILY HISTORIES 1 & 2 - Carol Baxter
Keen to write an engaging family history but stuck with little more than names and dates? Uncertain how to even begin? This talk will guide you along the pathway from pulling out your piles of dusty notes to crafting a story that your relatives will actually be keen to read.  

WRITING RESEARCH OR RESOURCE GUIDES - Shauna Hicks
How to turn your history or genealogy talks and presentations into research or resource guides is the main focus of this session. It is never possible to convey all you know about a topic in a single presentation and turning that additional knowledge into a printed guide for attendees to purchase has proved to be very successful for UTP speakers. Shauna will discuss the planning and writing processes behind her various Unlock the Past guides – from the smaller brief guides to the more complex resource directory.

 

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