Unlock the Past Cruises

Convicts - Australian royalty?

Event Information

When
  • 18 Jun 2016 9:00am - 12:30pm
Where
  • Queen Alexandra Conference Centre, 347 Old Cleveland Road
  • Coorparoo,
  • Queensland
Other Information
  • Cost: Members $25.00, Non-members $35.00
Contact

 Sifting the archival soil or raising Lazarus: constructing meaning from the micro biographies of the Penal

Station archive – Tamsin O’Connor, author and post-graduate student.

Based on my chapter in the 2001 book Chain Letters: Narrating Convict Lives, this paper will examine the way historians

can draw on disparate archival material to reveal the micro biographies of convict life and in turn explore larger themes of

the colonial and convict condition.

Depraved, wicked and demonic:  the impact of the convict stain on convicts nd their dependants.     Jan Richardson, Post-Graduate student, UNE

       The how and why of hidden convict backgrounds.  The reputation of the majority of convicts as hard-working, decent people came to an end with the anti-
      transportationist campaign of the mid-1800s.  Their reputations were ruined by the ‘convict stain’ and both the authorities and individuals took steps to hide all  
     
reference to convictism.  It took another one hundred years for the archives to be opened and research to be undertaken, by both historians and genealogists,
      which has now resulted in many Australians proudly proclaiming their convict ancestry.    
    

 A new on-line resource for genealogists - using the Biographical Database of Australia
Carole Williamson, family  historian and Vice President, GSQ.

The BDA is a new research tool for historians and genealogists comprising transcrips and indexes of many original records and published biographies of now deceased ancestors who arrive in, or were born in, Austratalia, starting from the earlies times of the Colony.    Records of events are linked to create a Biographical Report. From one Report, subscribers can hyperlink to another biography - to spouses. parents, children, witnesses, employers/employees and so on through the entire database.

"Till Death do us Part" - female convicts and marriage

Dr Jennifer Harrison – Researcher, University of Queensland, Research, University of Queensland, Patron, GSQ

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